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: CES 2016 New Electric Car Presentations

CES 2016 New Electric Car Presentations

16 Jan

From January 6 – 9, 2016, the CES 2016 tradeshow in Las Vegas was the site of many new electric car announcements by worldwide auto manufacturers.

This annual tradeshow is hosted by the Consumer Technology Association and attracts 170,000 international attendees from the consumer electronics and technology industries.

Over the last five years, CES 2016 has become an important venue for automotive manufacturers to unveil those vehicle platforms that are advancing the state of the art for mobile communication, electrification, and even autonomous driving.

These presentations are made in Las Vegas just two weeks before the annual North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Michigan, scooping some of the new car rollouts that would normally be presented later in the month.

This year, the automotive industry was once again an active presence at CES 2016 with nine out of the 10 largest manufacturers actively demonstrating and presenting. Keynote speakers included Mary Barra, CEO of GM and Dr. Herbert Diess, CEO of Volkswagen.

Both keynote speakers emphasized that the automotive industry will be going through many changes over the next five years, especially in the areas of electrification, wireless connectivity, and autonomous vehicle driving.

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Barra unveiled the Chevrolet Bolt electric car, that will be produced as a 2017 model. LG Chem in South Korea will provide the integrated battery pack, control electronics, and electric motor for this new vehicle that can travel over 200 miles before needing to recharge.
The Bolt will employ a battery pack that can store 60 kilowatt-hours of energy capacity.

The electric motor can produce 150 kilowatts, or 200 horsepower, to the front wheels of the Bolt with 266 lb-ft of torque. Acceleration from zero to 60 miles per hour is rated at just under seven seconds, making the Bolt fun to drive.

Recharging time for the 60-kWh battery pack can be accomplished in one hour by using a DC Fast Charge system or in nine hours overnight by using a J1772 AC Level 2 charging system.

GM is also expanding the Bolt platform to have more wireless app capability as well as autonomous vehicle technologies. Barra announced a partnership with Lyft to develop autonomous, electric vehicles for its ride share business model.

The Bolt will also be compatible with automotive apps from Apple CarPlay and Android Auto through its OnStar wireless platform.

Dr. Herbert Deiss, CEO of Volkswagen, led off his keynote speech with an apology about the VW diesel emissions deception perpetrated by his car company that will result in damaging lawsuits and penalties over the next few years.

However, he pivoted to emphasize that Volkswagen is looking to remake its automotive platforms to be “zero-emission, connected, self-driving, and a new definition of man’s best friend.”

The company rolled out the BUDD-e electric Microbus that showcased many of these technologies that Volkswagens plans to bring online by 2019, including its Modular Electric Toolkit platform equipped with two electric motors and driven by a battery pack with 101 kilowatt-hours of energy storage capacity.

Ford announced that it would invest billions of dollars in research towards new technology automotive platforms over the next five years and would add battery-powered electrification to thirteen more vehicle platforms in its product line by 2020, approximately 40% of its vehicle fleet offerings.

BMW offered test rides in the i3 electric car and i8 plug-in hybrid electric car. The company has developed its own DC Fast Charge technology and has been actively partnering with Nissan to install a network of DC Fast Charge stations across the country with both ChadeMo and Combined Charging System connector plugs. The company will also be partnering with Samsung to develop more connected apps, including one that integrated a BMW smart car with a smart home.

Top-down view of single-seat electric race car concept by Faraday Future, based on its Variable Platform Architecture.

Top-down view of single-seat electric race car concept by Faraday Future, based on its Variable Platform Architecture.

Faraday Future staged its first exhibit in the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center to packed audiences and curious CES attendees, after unveiling the FF Zero 1 concept race car earlier in the week.

Audi unveiled the latest version of its E-tron Quattro concept electric car at CES 2016, while also announcing more Piloted Driving features for future autonomous vehicle applications.

Kia Motors recently received red license plates from the Nevada DMV to test the Kia Soul EV autonomous vehicle on Nevada roads. Kia Motors recently received red license plates from the Nevada DMV to test the Kia Soul EV autonomous vehicle on Nevada roads.[/caption]

Nevada was the first state in the nation to allow autonomous vehicle testing on its roads and highways. Kia Motors, Daimler and Google have received red Nevada license plates for their vehicle testing programs. The Kia Soul EV has been the platform for enabling autonomous driving for Kia Motors. Daimler’s Freightliner trucks also have licenses to drive autonomously on Nevada highways, but by law a passenger must be seated behind the steering wheel of the driver’s seat, to manually intervene if the vehicle has a malfunction in its navigation algorithms and sensors.

SAE International and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have defined category guidelines for different levels of autonomy in a self-driving vehicle:

SAE International Autonomous Vehicle rating system (SAE J3016):
http://www.sae.org/misc/pdfs/automated_driving.pdf

“No Automation (Level 0): The full performance of the human driver of all aspects of the dynamic driving task, even when enhanced by warning or intervention systems.

Driver Assistance (Level 1): The driving mode-specific execution by a driver assistance system of either steering or acceleration/deceleration by using information about the driving environment and with the expectation that the human driver perform all remaining aspects of the dynamic driving task.

Partial Automation (Level 2): The driving mode-specific execution by one or more driver assistance systems of both steering and acceleration/deceleration by using information about the driving environment and with the expectation that the human driver perform all remaining aspects of the dynamic driving task.

Conditional Automation (Level 3): The driving mode-specific performance by an automated driving system of all aspects of the dynamic driving task with the expectation that the human driver will respond appropriately to a request to intervene.

High Automation (Level 4): The driving mode-specific performance by an automated driving system of all aspects of the dynamic driving task, even if a human driver does not respond appropriately to a request to intervene.

Full Automation (Level 5): The full-time performance by an automated driving system of all aspects of the dynamic driving task under all roadway and environmental conditions that can be managed by a human driver.

NHTSA Autonomous Vehicle rating system:
http://www.nhtsa.gov/About+NHTSA/Press+Releases/U.S.+Department+of+Transportation+Releases+Policy+on+Automated+Vehicle+Development

“No-Automation (Level 0): The driver is in complete and sole control of the primary vehicle controls – brake, steering, throttle, and motive power – at all times.

Function-specific Automation (Level 1): Automation at this level involves one or more specific control functions. Examples include electronic stability control or pre-charged brakes, where the vehicle automatically assists with braking to enable the driver to regain control of the vehicle or stop faster than possible by acting alone.

Combined Function Automation (Level 2): This level involves automation of at least two primary control functions designed to work in unison to relieve the driver of control of those functions. An example of combined functions enabling a Level 2 system is adaptive cruise control in combination with lane centering.

Limited Self-Driving Automation (Level 3): Vehicles at this level of automation enable the driver to cede full control of all safety-critical functions nder certain traffic or environmental conditions and in those conditions to rely heavily on the vehicle to monitor for changes in those conditions requiring transition back to driver control. The driver is expected to be available for occasional control, but with sufficiently comfortable transition time. The Google car is an example of limited self-driving automation.

Full Self-Driving Automation (Level 4): The vehicle is designed to perform all safety-critical driving functions and monitor roadway conditions for an entire trip. Such a design anticipates that the driver will provide destination or navigation input, but is not expected to be available for control at any time during the trip. This includes both occupied and unoccupied vehicle technology programs.”

Tesla Motors continues to add autonomous features to its autopilot updates for the Model S and Model X electric cars, including a new “summons” and automatic perpendicular parking features that became available to Tesla owners just after CES 2016 and before the start of the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Michigan.

Panasonic also announced that its company would increase its investment in the Tesla Motors Gigafactory in Storey County, Nevada to $1.6 billion dollars.

Ehang 184 autonomous drone can carry one passenger weighing up to 220 lbs. for 23-minute  flights.

Ehang 184 autonomous drone can carry one passenger weighing up to 220 lbs. for 23-minute flights.

An autonomous flying car was also exhibited at CES 2016. Ehang, a manufacturer of the Ghost Drone, has built the first human-sized concept drone. The Ehang Model 184 is an autonomous electric drone that will be able to carry a single passenger, weighing up to 220 pounds, for 23 airborne minutes at a speed of 60 MPH with its four counter-rotating propeller motors. Its battery pack can be recharged in two to four hours. The EHang 184 is just 4.5 feet tall and weighs 440 pounds.

The passenger enters a travel destination on a digital map shown on the front dashboard panel. The drone takes off, flies and lands under its own control while its internal instruments are monitored through the Internet and a cloud server.

The passenger rides along without access to a steering wheel, to minimize the possibility of human error. If one or two of the four propeller motors fail, the drone can still land itself.

The Ehang 184 has gull-wing doors, a sled landing platform, and four propeller arms that fold up for easy storage, taking up the same parking space as a car when not in use. Check out the company’s background story about their design project through this YouTube video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vGd1Oy7Cw0

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NEVA blog posted by Stan Hanel, Outreach Coordinator

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