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: Nevada Charging Station Infrastructure Continues Growth

Nevada Charging Station Infrastructure Continues Growth

15 Feb

Despite lower gasoline prices nationwide and lower crude oil commodity prices, electric car charging infrastructure within the state of Nevada continues to grow.

On February 4, 2016 the first DC Quick Charge facility on the Nevada Electric Highway became operational in Beatty, Nevada not far from the entrance to Death Valley National Park.

The location of the site at 550 Veterans Memorial Highway on US Highway 95 is 117 miles northwest of Las Vegas and 330 miles southeast of Reno, Nevada.

Electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) includes eight Tesla Supercharger stations, a ChargePoint/Efacec QC45 DC Quick Charge station with both ChadeMo and Combined Charging System standard connector plugs, and a second ChargePoint station with two SAE J1772 AC Level 2 connector plugs.

ChargePoint  DC Quick Charge Station with ChadeMo and CCS connectors next to ChargePoint station with two AC Level 2 ports at Beatty site on Nevada Electric Highway

ChargePoint DC Quick Charge Station with ChadeMo and CCS connectors next to ChargePoint station with two AC Level 2 ports at Beatty site on Nevada Electric Highway

Eight Tesla Supercharger stations are part of Beatty DC Quick Charge site on Nevada Electric Highway

Eight Tesla Supercharger stations are part of Beatty DC Quick Charge site on Nevada Electric Highway

The first leg of the Nevada Electric Highway was announced on June 16, 2015 as a joint venture between the Nevada Governor’s Office of Energy, NV Energy, and Valley Electric Association.

The initial five DC Quick Charge sites along US Highway 95 would be located at Indian Springs, Beatty, Tonopah, Hawthorne and Fallon. Each location is spaced about 100 miles apart on the journey from Las Vegas to Reno, anticipating the arrival of more electric vehicles with battery packs that can travel over 200 miles by the end of 2020.

At present, only the Tesla Model S or Model X would be able to safely use all of these stations to travel between Reno and Las Vegas, without needing a supplemental charge in between the DC Quick Charge sites. However, by 2017 the first Chevrolet Bolts will be produced with a battery pack range of 200 miles, as well as longer-range versions of the Nissan LEAF, BMW i3, and Ford Focus EV that will exceed 100 miles between charging opportunities.

The distance from Las Vegas to Indian Springs is about 45 miles. Indian Springs to Beatty is about 73 miles, from Beatty to Tonopah is about 94 miles, from Tonopah to Hawthorne is about 104 miles, from Hawthorne to Fallon is about 72 miles, and the distance from Fallon to Reno is about 63 miles.

For adventurous trailblazers who want to try a pioneering EV-charging roadtrip, plan carefully. Supplemental charging stations can be found at rural RV campgrounds along US Highway 95 that host NEMA 14-50 plug connectors to provide electric power at campsites for RV customers. An EV driver should call ahead to check availability and reserve a campsite as part of pre-trip planning activities that include additional charging station options along the US-95.

For example, the Sunrise Valley RV Park at Mina, Nevada is 70 miles northwest of Tonopah and 34 miles southeast of Hawthorne, providing a midway stopping point for lower-mileage EVs to find enough electrical charge to go the final distance:


http://www.sunrisevalley.com/

NEMA 14-50 outlets can provide about 240 VAC at 50 Amps and 30-amp hookups are also available at this RV park. EV travelers will need a portable SAE J1772 AC Level 2 charging station with a NEMA 14-50 adapter plug in order to use these facilities. The Tesla Roadster, Model S and Model X provide these adapters as part of their basic portable charging kits.

AC Level 1 charging is also usually available at campgrounds from any 110 VAC outlet with at least a 15-Amp rating.

Check elevation between each leg, as well, to determine how much of the journey is uphill or downhill. EVs with good regenerative braking capabilities might be able to stretch their mileage more going downhill and coasting, while uphill stretches will shorten EV range.

Happy Trails!

Blog posted by Stan Hanel, NEVA Outreach Coordinator

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